How to write a thesis statement for an expository essay

Students prefer to spend time on engagement at the expense of serious academic work. Recalling the words from Lana Del Rey’s song “young and beautiful”, I think it’s normal to have a hunger for life enjoyment. But first you study, than you relax. It is a prescribed life law or let me call it as a rational approach to time management building. So, for those who want to succeed in writing a thesis, PhD work or a research paper, it’d better to start with planning. To cope with this fundamental work it is necessary to keep track of noting all the sources from which information was taken. Citations and references list must be given sufficient notice, because even a petty carelessness may lead to big problems related to academic dishonesty. Anyway, it’s always better to do everything possible to prevent plagiarism, than to be hard hit by this sudden disaster. Besides, there’s an opportunity to scan your paper against eBooks and web pages with Unplag plagiarism detection engine that highlights similarities, duplicated content, and incorrect formatted citations. Simply put, you will be given a chance to remedy the petty defects on time.

  Writing for an Audience Who is your audience? 

  1. Researchers working in analogous field areas elsewhere in the world (. other strike-slip faults, other deep sea fans). 
  2. Researchers working in your field area, but with different techniques.
  3. Researchers working on the same interval of geologic time elsewhere in the world. 
  4. All other researchers using the same technique you have used . 
  5. If your study encompasses an active process, researchers working on the same process in the ancient record.
  6. Conversely, if your study is based on the rock record, people studying modem analogs. 
  7. People writing a synthesis paper on important new developments in your field.
  8. People applying earth science to societal problems (. earthquake hazard reduction, climate warming) who will try to understand your paper. 
  9. Potential reviewers of your manuscript or your thesis committee.

13. Include a title on your proposal. I'm amazed at how often the title is left for the end of the student's writing and then somehow forgotten when the proposal is prepared for the committee. A good proposal has a good title and it is the first thing to help the reader begin to understand the nature of your work. Use it wisely! Work on your title early in the process and revisit it often. It's easy for a reader to identify those proposals where the title has been focused upon by the student. Preparing a good title means:

    ...having the most important words appear toward the beginning of your title,

    ...limiting the use of ambiguous or confusing words,

    ..breaking your title up into a title and subtitle when you have too many words, and

    ...including key words that will help researchers in the future find your work.
14. It's important that your research proposal be organized around a set of questions that will guide your research. When selecting these guiding questions try to write them so that they frame your research and put it into perspective with other research. These questions must serve to establish the link between your research and other research that has preceded you. Your research questions should clearly show the relationship of your research to your field of study. Don't be carried away at this point and make your questions too narrow. You must start with broad relational questions.

There should be a strong connection between your conclusion and your introduction. All the themes and issues that you raised in your introduction must be referred to again in one way or another. If you find out at this stage that your thesis has not tackled an issue that you raised in the introduction, you should go back to the introduction and delete the reference to that issue. An elegant way to structure the text is to use the same textual figure or case in the beginning as well as in the end. When the figure returns in the final section, it will have taken on a new and richer meaning through the insights you have encountered, created in the process of writing.  

How to write a thesis statement for an expository essay

how to write a thesis statement for an expository essay

There should be a strong connection between your conclusion and your introduction. All the themes and issues that you raised in your introduction must be referred to again in one way or another. If you find out at this stage that your thesis has not tackled an issue that you raised in the introduction, you should go back to the introduction and delete the reference to that issue. An elegant way to structure the text is to use the same textual figure or case in the beginning as well as in the end. When the figure returns in the final section, it will have taken on a new and richer meaning through the insights you have encountered, created in the process of writing.  

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